New Young Adult Speculative Fiction April 2021

I come bearing gifts of great reading! Here’s a comprehensive guide to young adult speculative fiction (science fiction, fantasy, horror) being published in April 2021. Up first is a short list of the books I highly recommend, followed by a long list of basically every book being published. Books that are crossed out and have no description or link are not recommended, either because they contain problematic/offensive content or are written by authors I find problematic.

Get your library cards and indie bookstore pre-orders ready, y’all.

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12th Grade Summer Reading Recommendations – 2021

As a high school librarian, offering reading recommendations for students is one of my favorite parts of my job. These lists are for parents, library workers, and teen readers. In particular, this list is aimed at current and rising twelfth graders.

Educators are welcome to use these lists either as a whole (please credit me and let me know) or as inspiration. I always suggest providing students a list of material to choose from rather than requiring all students to read one thing. That way the students can find something that meets them where they are or allows them to stretch at their own pace. The point of summer reading should be to foster a love of reading, not force every kid into the same small box.

I created these lists through an alchemy involving age of the protagonists, themes, genre, tone, complexity, reader skill/comfortability level, events and topics a student will likely encounter in their studies during the school year, and books they are unlikely to read for school. I also tried to pick materials that published in the last few years or will be published by June 2021. Preference to #ownvoices and marginalized authors.

All links affiliate.

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11th Grade Summer Reading Recommendations – 2021

As a high school librarian, offering reading recommendations for students is one of my favorite parts of my job. These lists are for parents, library workers, and teen readers. In particular, this list is aimed at current and rising eleventh graders.

Educators are welcome to use these lists either as a whole (please credit me and let me know) or as inspiration. I always suggest providing students a list of material to choose from rather than requiring all students to read one thing. That way the students can find something that meets them where they are or allows them to stretch at their own pace. The point of summer reading should be to foster a love of reading, not force every kid into the same small box.

I created these lists through an alchemy involving age of the protagonists, themes, genre, tone, complexity, reader skill/comfortability level, events and topics a student will likely encounter in their studies during the school year, and books they are unlikely to read for school. I also tried to pick materials that published in the last few years or will be published by June 2021. Preference to #ownvoices and marginalized authors.

All links affiliate.

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10th Grade Summer Reading Recommendations – 2021

As a high school librarian, offering reading recommendations for students is one of my favorite parts of my job. These lists are for parents, library workers, and teen readers. In particular, this list is aimed at current and rising tenth graders.

Educators are welcome to use these lists either as a whole (please credit me and let me know) or as inspiration. I always suggest providing students a list of material to choose from rather than requiring all students to read one thing. That way the students can find something that meets them where they are or allows them to stretch at their own pace. The point of summer reading should be to foster a love of reading, not force every kid into the same small box.

I created these lists through an alchemy involving age of the protagonists, themes, genre, tone, complexity, reader skill/comfortability level, events and topics a student will likely encounter in their studies during the school year, and books they are unlikely to read for school. I also tried to pick materials that published in the last few years or will be published by June 2021. Preference to #ownvoices and marginalized authors.

All links affiliate.

Continue reading “10th Grade Summer Reading Recommendations – 2021”

9th Grade Summer Reading Recommendations – 2021

As a high school librarian, offering reading recommendations for students is one of my favorite parts of my job. These lists are for parents, library workers, and teen readers. In particular, this list is aimed at current and rising ninth graders.

Educators are welcome to use these lists either as a whole (please credit me and let me know) or as inspiration. I always suggest providing students a list of material to choose from rather than requiring all students to read one thing. That way the students can find something that meets them where they are or allows them to stretch at their own pace. The point of summer reading should be to foster a love of reading, not force every kid into the same small box.

I created these lists through an alchemy involving age of the protagonists, themes, genre, tone, complexity, reader skill/comfortability level, events and topics a student will likely encounter in their studies during the school year, and books they are unlikely to read for school. I also tried to pick materials that published in the last few years or will be published by June 2021. Preference to #ownvoices and marginalized authors.

All links affiliate.

Continue reading “9th Grade Summer Reading Recommendations – 2021”

BLOSSOM Conference Response

Last week, I attended the library conference BLOSSOM, “A free 3 day virtual symposium for library staff focused on their health and wellness.” I was also on the panel “Reframing Library Work: A Discussion on Centering Staff Agency, Advocacy and Well Being.” It was, in my opinion, a great panel. My co-panelists were honest and well-spoken and we discussed some heavy, important topics. After the panel, we debriefed an incident that happened in the discussion (I tweeted about it here) and our use of swear words. We all seemed to feel positive about how it went down. I walked out of the conference feeling invigorated and empowered.

Earlier this week, Bobbi Newman, one of the conference organizers and the moderator (and I use that word very loosely) on our panel, sent out an email requesting attendee feedback. I submitted positive feedback as an attendee. (As of now, the morning of April 1, she has not sent out the panelist survey that she said she would.)

Then yesterday afternoon I encountered Bobbi’s blog post that was in part about my panel. I’ll get into the details of the post in a moment, but the summary is that she felt the language I and another panelist used was inappropriate and “excessive” and that audience feedback indicated that some attendees were also “uncomfortable” with our use of profanity.

Okay. So.

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