Review: “Song of the Abyss” by Makiia Lucier

SongOfTheAbyss-feat

Release Date: August 27, 2019
Series: Tower of Winds #2
Publisher: HMH Books for Young Readers
Genre: Young Adult, Historical Fantasy

Description

“As the granddaughter of a famed navigator, seventeen-year-old Reyna has always lived life on her own terms, despite those who say a girl could never be an explorer for the royal house of St. John del Mar. She is determined to prove them wrong, and as she returns home after a year-long expedition, she knows her dream is within reach. No longer an apprentice, instead: Reyna, Master Explorer.

But when menacing raiders attack her ship, those dreams are pushed aside. Reyna’s escape is both desperate and dangerous, and when next she sees her ship, a mystery rises from the deep. The sailors–her captain, her countrymen–have vanished. To find them, Reyna must use every resource at her disposal . . . including placing her trust in a handsome prince from a rival kingdom.

Together they uncover a disturbing truth. The attack was no isolated incident. Troubling signs point to a shadowy kingdom in the north, and for once, the rulers of the Sea of Magdalen agree: something must be done. But can Reyna be brave enough to find a way?”

 

My Thoughts

SongAbyss-coverThe first book in Makiia Lucier’s Tower of Winds series, Isle of Blood and Stone, was the perfect summer beach read: cozy but rollicking, exhilarating but soothing, romantic yet action-packed. Happily, Song of the Abyss continues that trend. It is one of those rare sequels that is just as good as its predecessor. Lucier deftly expands the world without flooding the reading with extraneous information and builds on the momentum of the first book while hitting many of the same beats. Where Isle of Blood and Stone had only a dash of historical fantasy, Song of the Abyss is practically brimming with it. From bloodthirsty sea monsters to underwater spirits enchanting songstresses to magical trade exports, this time the fantasy themes are main players rather than intriguing extras…

To read the rest of my review, head over to Tor.com.

 

Thanks to HMH Books for Young Readers for sending me a review copy.

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